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RCMP Reclassifying Firearms and "Rifle Stocks" in Run Up to the end of Long Gun Registration.

The RCMP has been issuing registration revocation notices and demands to surrender in regards to certain registered firearms owned by firearms license holders.

The purpose of this is to force the confiscation of as many registered non restricted firearms as possible before the requirement to hold a registration for a non restricted long gun ends after Bill C-19 becomes law.

Principally, this situation affects the owners of these two firearms:

A.    Armi Jaeger AP80 .22 Caliber Carbine.

The Armi Jaeger AP80 is a .22 Caliber semi automatic carbine manufactured 20 to 25 years ago in Italy to outwardly resemble the Russian AK47 rifle.

As part of the C-68 Firearms Act (1995) certain semi automatic look-a-likes of the Russian AK47 rifle were declared "variants" of the AK47, and either reclassified from the restricted category they fell under the Progressive Conservative Firearms Act C-17(1992), to the "prohibited" category or prohibited outright.

The Liberal government that imposed the C-68 Firearms Act failed to inform firearms owners that this reclassification occurred, and failed to inform them of its implications.

Many owners of the .22 caliber AP80 rifles were unaware of the change of classification.

In the run up to the deadline for the registration of all non restricted long guns in Canada, 12/31/2002, the government abandoned the legal requirement for verification of all firearms prior to registration in order to register or re register as many firearms as possible, in order demonstrate compliance with the program - a compliance that was never achieved.

Verification, apparently, would take place at a later date. This later verification process never happened.

Some owners of Armi Jaeger .22 rifles who licensed themselves and registered their firearms as demanded, as "non-restricted" firearms - without verification and unaware of the actual classification of the firearm.

In the chaos that has characterized the Canadian Firearms Program from its inception these owners were issued registrations for these firearms with that "Non Restricted" classification.

The RCMP is now reviewing all registration records for registered non restricted firearms in order to confiscate as many "incorrectly" registered non restricted firearms as possible.

If you hold a registration for a "non-restricted" Armi Jaeger AP80, you have received or will receive a "notice of registration revocation" from the RCMP.

You have these options:

1. Allow RCMP to confiscate the gun. There will be no compensation paid.

2. Transfer the firearm to an individual or business licensed to own the firearm. The classification is 12(5) semi automatic AK47 variant.

3. Apply for a Reference Hearing in your provincial court and challenge the RCMPs actions. By doing this, you remain in lawful ownership of the firearm for the time it takes for the reference hearing to be heard by a judge.

If you are an Armi Jaeger AP80 owner and you are interested in this option, please contact NFA.

B.    Walther G22 Carbine.

The Walther G22 is a .22 caliber semi automatic carbine in the "bullpup" configuration.

Despite popular misconception, "bull pup" rifles are not prohibited in Canada. Aftermarket bull pup stocks designed to reduce the overall length of a rifle are classified as "prohibited devices", and certain bull pup rifles are proscribed as prohibited firearms through Order in Council.

RCMP has been sending notices to registered owners of Walther G22 carbines that the stock on their rifle is now considered a "prohibited device" - a prohibited aftermarket stock.

The classification of the firearm - barreled action and receiver, apparently has not changed. It remains "non-restricted".

If you are the owner of a Walther G22 who has received this notification, you have the following options:

1. Remove the stock from the firearm, and allow RCMP to confiscate the stock. There will be no compensation paid.

2. Transfer the stock to a business licensed to own "prohibited devices".

3. Apply for a Reference Hearing in your provincial court and challenge the RCMPs actions. By doing this, you remain in lawful ownership of the G22 stock for the time it takes for the reference hearing to be heard by a judge.

If you are a Walther G22 owner and you are interested in this option, please contact NFA.

To put a new spin on an old term the Canadian firearms community is familiar with,

It doesn't have to make sense. It's RCMP policy.